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Dr, Anderson Attends Ohio Urologic Society Annual Meeting in Columbus

Dayton Physicians Network

In mid-April was the Ohio Urologic Society Annual Meeting in Columbus. At this meeting, Dayton Physicians Network’s Blake Anderson, MD took part of a panel about Management of Complex Stone Disease. The moderator for the discussion was Sri Sivalingam and other panelists were Mantu Gupta, MD, Smita De, MD, PhD, Michael Sourial, MD.

Dr. Anderson said “I really enjoyed being on the moderator panel for management of complex stone disease.” In the discussion several cases were presented and the panelists all weighed in on different approaches. One case discussed was, how to treat 10 cm of bladder stones in a man with BPH (enlarged prostate). Also discussed, was a case of a septic woman with recent chemotherapy for breast cancer with bilateral obstructing stones.

All the Panelists noted that there were multiple options for treatment but many factors had to be considered. Below is Dr. Anderson take on the discussion, treatment options, and considerable factors.

“How to treat 10 cm of bladder stones in a man with BPH (enlarged prostate. Options are: shockpulse and laser lithotripsy, then holmium laser enucleation of the prostate.
For the bladder stone cases in general, I am in favor a of combination approach to obstructive prostate tissue under the same anesthetic when feasible as bladder stones typically only form in the setting of obstruction. KUB should be done or can check scout film of CT if that has already been done to see if bladder stones are visible, if not may contain uric acid and preoperative medical therapy with potassium citrate could significantly decrease stone burden.

Kidney stone cases were numerous, incomplete left duplex kidney with large upper pole stone burden, difficult renal access and discussed special techniques to do this and accomplish PCNL.
Another case was of a septic woman with recent chemotherapy for breast cancer with bilateral obstructing stones, discussed ureteral stents or bilateral nephrostomy tubes as options, each with own advantages but both effective in prior studies. This decision involves a lot of patient specific variables, stone size, stone location, anticoagulation status and other anatomic considerations. In patients with low urine pH and low stone Hounsfield units on CT, especially in setting of recent chemotherapy, suspicion for uric acid stones should be high and stone dissolution therapy should be considered (medication, potassium citrate, raises urine pH and can dissolve uric acid stones).”

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