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Dayton Physicians Network

Coronavirus: What You Should Know

At Dayton Physicians Network the safety and well-being of our patients, staff, visitors, and the community is our top priority. To help you learn more, here is some basic information about the disease. 

Dayton Physicians Network is committed to your safety and well-being.

  • In order to safeguard the health and safety of all patients we are no longer allowing patients to be escorted or accompanied by caregivers within our facilities. Exceptions will only be made for patients with severely limited mobility, neurocognitive disorders and those who are unable to consent for themselves.
  • No one under the age of 18 will be permitted in the facility.
  • Please call us prior to your visit if you have any symptoms with the onset of fever, cough and shortness of breath.
  • Dayton Physicians Network will continue to screen patients upon arrival at the respective campus. We will ask a series of questions and your temperature will be measured. If you answer yes to any of the questions or have a fever, we will provide you with instructions on how to proceed.
  • We are asking all patients to bring a mask if they have one available.
  • Our offices may look a little different due to social distancing as we are utilizing decals on floors and chair spacing in waiting areas.

 

Questions about Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19)?

If you have questions regarding COVID-19, please call the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) hotline at 833-427-5634.

What is coronavirus?

The novel coronavirus, or COVID-19, is a new virus and disease unknown before the outbreak began in December 2019.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

Symptoms of COVID-19 can range from mild to severe, with the majority being mild. The symptoms may appear two to 14 days after exposure and include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Flu-like symptoms

 

What should I do if I have these symptoms?

If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, call your primary care provider.  Please do not go directly to your doctor’s office or emergency department without calling first, since many can isolate at home without being evaluated in person.

What can I do to prepare?

There are some steps you can take to prepare your family for COVID-19. Here is a checklist from the Ohio Department of Health to help you prepare. 

How can I protect myself?

The best ways to protect yourself are by washing your hands with sanitizer or using soap and water for at least 20 seconds; not touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands; and avoiding contact with people who are sick.

If you are sick, stay at home, avoid contact with others, and cover your mouth and nose when you sneeze or cough.

Social Distancing

The CDC continues to advise that the best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus. “Social distancing” means remaining out of congregate settings, avoiding mass gatherings, and maintaining distance (approximately 6 feet or 2 meters) from others when possible. Social distancing is not the same as self-quarantine or isolation, two other practices being utilized to minimize the coronavirus spread. The key difference is that a quarantine or isolation restricts the movement of people within a certain area or zone to limit transferring and spreading an infection. Social distancing places no such locational constraints, rather it is a behavioral practice to lower the risk in most circumstances. Clearly, there are instances where it’s hard to keep a certain kind of distance from other people — when traveling via public transportation, for example, or using an elevator. Accessing public services like the post office, the bank or a grocery store can also be challenging, as can socializing in public settings. Social distancing in these cases means doing the best that you can — be that with regards to personal space or related personal safety strategies. Some things you can reasonably include the following:

  • Take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others; at work this includes replacing face-to-face communications with phone calls, conference calls, email and jabber whenever possible.
  • When you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick, limit close contact and wash your hands often.
  • Avoid crowds as much as possible.
  • Avoid cruise travel and non-essential air travel.
  • Stay home as much as possible to further reduce your risk of being exposed.
  • Consider ways of getting food brought to your house through family, social, or commercial networks.
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