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Scalp Cooling Treatment is now available at Dayton Physicians Network locations

Chemotherapy-induced hair loss is widely recognized as the most feared side effect associated with cancer treatment. It is often the first question that people ask when they learn they will require chemotherapy, “Will I lose my hair?” Many patients rank hair loss as the most feared and traumatic side effect of their cancer treatment, it can lead to social isolation and the psychological effect is high often having a dramatic impact on self-esteem.

Paxman Scalp Cooling empowers patients to feel a greater sense of control. That is why, here at Dayton Physicians Network, we are delighted to offer the option of this treatment – also known as ‘cold cap’ – to help reduce hair loss for patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment at Greater Dayton Cancer Center.

Why Chemotherapy Makes Hair Fall Out

https://coldcap.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Paxman-How-It-Works.mp4 Chemotherapy works by targeting all rapidly dividing cells, and hair cells are the second-fastest-dividing cells in the body, which is why many chemotherapy drugs cause hair loss. Vulnerable hair follicles in the growth phase are attacked, resulting in rapid and extensive hair loss approximately two weeks after the start of chemotherapy.

Scalp Cooling Technology can alleviate the damage caused to the hair follicles by chemotherapy by reducing the temperature of the scalp by a few degrees before, during, and after chemotherapy treatment. This cooling causes blood vessel vasoconstriction in the scalp, which reduces blood flow and, therefore, reduces the number of chemotherapy agents that reach the hair follicles. The treatment is safe and relatively easy to tolerate. The most common side effect is a minor headache caused by the cooling. Research shows that scalp cooling does not affect cancer treatment and for patients, this means the opportunity to regain some control, maintain their privacy, and encourage a positive attitude toward their illness and treatment.

The success rate for Scalp Cooling is up to 70% for some chemotherapy regimens. It is lower for other regimens, but there is evidence that scalp cooling encourages faster, healthier and stronger regrowth than would occur without scalp cooling.

Financial Assistance

Financial assistance for Scalp Cooling is available [ https://coldcap.com/i-want-to-scalp-cool/financialsupport http://www.hairtostay.org/ ] Hair To Stay is a national non-profit subsidizing scalp cooling patients.

About Paxman

Paxman develops and offers the market leading Paxman Scalp Cooling System used to minimize hair loss in connection with chemotherapy treatment. Scalp cooling treatment has strong clinical support and is a fully established therapy in many countries throughout the world. Presently, the system is available at a large number of cancer centres in Europe, North- and South America, Asia and Australia. With more than 4,000 delivered systems to over 50 international markets, Paxman is the leading player in its field.

Paxman was founded as a family business by Glenn Paxman following his wife Sue Paxman’s hair loss in connection with chemotherapy treatment for cancer. The Paxman Scalp Cooling System is a self-contained, mobile, and electrically powered cooling unit, which circulates liquid coolant at low pressure through a special cooling cap on the patient’s head. The circulation of the refrigerated coolant through the cap extracts heat from the patient’s scalp maintaining temperature.

Each cooling unit has an integrated touch screen with a menu-controlled, graphic user interface that makes it easy for healthcare staff to initiate, monitor and complete the scalp cooling process. The associated Paxman cold cap is made from lightweight, biocompatible silicone that is soft and flexible, providing an optimal fit for the patient.

Indication

Paxman Scalp Cooling System is indicated to reduce the likelihood of chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) in cancer patients with solid tumors such as ovarian, breast, colorectal and prostate cancer.

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